Volume 5, Number 1, January 2004


Title:

Flexible Layout System for Road Graph Representation Based on Cognitive Map
 

Author & Affiliation:

Naoto Mukai (Nagoya University), Tsuneo Watanabe (Shiga University), Naohiro Ishi (Aichi Institute of Technology)

 
Abstract:

A road graph representation is one of the important spatial representations in the Geographical Information System (GIS). However, the topology of the graph is often difficult for users in their understanding. In addition, the traditional map layout system could not represent the semantics of maps. Therefore, we propose a delivery system for flexible maps which can satisfy userís spatial layout constraints. Firstly, we define road graph representation in different abstraction levels based on map recognition process called cognitive map model used in psychological area. In our system, road graphs are described as XML documents. The elements of the document represent nodes or edges in the road graph. Secondly, we propose a layout algorithm using simulated annealing. The semantics of maps such as route map or focus map are specified by the combination of Visual Organization Features (VOFs). The VOFs are replaced with the costs of simulated annealing algorithm by converting them into a set of spring-like forces. Finally, our system converts the XML document into SVG document and sends to users.

   
Title:

Workload Characterization Using Metrics Based on Instruction Grouping

 
Author & Affiliation: Carl Herder and Jozo J. Dujmović (San Francisco State University)
 
Abstract:

This paper investigates workload metrics based on instruction grouping. The focus is on the Java bytecode instruction set, but the principles are generally applicable across architectures, wherever a workload can be described by frequencies of a set of instructions or other basic operators. We discuss the motivation and justification for grouping frequencies of related instructions and propose an iterative grouping methodology. The effects of our approach are demonstrated using cluster analysis of SPEC JVM98 benchmarks.

 
Title: Software Engineering for Computer Science Research Facilitating Improved Research Outcomes
 
Author & Affiliation: Andre Oboler (Lancaster University), David McG. Squire and Kevin B. Korb (Monash University)
 
Abstract:

The development process used by researchers often seems to be random and unsystematic. A Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) is often not considered, internal commenting is scarce, and external documentation takes the form of erasure marks left on whiteboards. Configuration management is paid lip-service, but is not standard practice. This paper examines some reasons behind the apparent large-scale non-adoption of software engineering in academic research. We also look at the effects on some projects where it was adopted. Finally we present a new SDLC designed for the academic research environment, suggest an organisational structure to maximize the benefit to research students, academics, and the institution.

 
Title: Incorporating Access Control Policies in Requirements Engineering
 
Author & Affiliation:

Khaled Alghathbar (King Saud University), Duminda Wijesekera (George Mason University)

 
Abstract: To improve software security, security requirements must be considered along with functional requirements during the early development life cycle. Systematic development of security sensitive software requires that there be a sufficiently expressive linguistic extension to model them. We propose an extension to the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to satisfy this need. We extend the UML metamodel with a security policy constraint specification and enforcement module, business tasks and a history log for method calls. Using these extensions we show how dynamic access control requirements of an application can be modeled during the design phase.
 
Title: On XML Data Processing through F-logic Query Processing
 
Author & Affiliation: Seonggyu Kim (Anyang University)
 
Abstract:

With the advent of XML and database languages armed with the object-oriented concept and deductive logic, the problem of efficient query processing for them has become a major issue. We describe a way of processing semi-structured XML data through explanation of query processing of an F-logic database. We have shown how to convert an XML data model to an F-logic data model. Such transformation provides an intuitive way for view definitions and schema reasoning, and thus can make formulating data mining queries and building a semantic web an easy task. We have then presented an efficient query processing method based on connection graph resolution. We have also presented a compatibility test algorithm using the fact substitution satisfy associative and homomorphic laws to reduce search space in a database.

 
Title: Pervasive Shannon Metrics and Component-Based Software
 
Author & Affiliation:

Remzi Seker (Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University), Ozgur Aktunc, Bunyamin Ozaydin and Murat M. Tanik  (University of Alabama at Birmingham), Leon Jololian (New Jersey City University)

 
Abstract:

To deal with the ever-increasing size and complexity of software, component-based software development (CBSD) is emerging as a viable alternative to traditional development methodologies. Software components developed by third parties using different languages and platforms are expected to be deployed and interoperate within heterogeneous environments. However, since the use of a component only requires its executable code, it is expected that the source code of a component may not always be available. The lack of source code can limit our ability to use classical analysis tools and metrics for measuring important component properties. In this paper, we present a modeling and analysis techniques based on Shannonís noiseless channel concepts and propose a new set of metrics, the Pervasive Shannon Metrics (PSM), which can be applied on a domain-specific basis.  We demonstrate the use of these metrics on a component, offered by SUN Microsystems and, widely available on the Web. We show that our metrics can be useful during system evolution in identifying and measuring potential performance degradation.

 
Title: Fuzzy Subtractive Clustering Based Indexing Approach For Software Components Classification
 
Author & Affiliation:

Sathit Nakkrasae (Ramkhamhaeng University), Peraphon Sophatsathit (Chulalongkorn University), William R. Edwards, Jr. (University of Louisiana)

 
Abstract:

Software Engineering is not only a technical discipline of its own, but also a problem domain where technologies coming from other disciplines are relevant and can play important role. One important example is knowledge engineering [1], a term that used in a board sense to encompass artificial intelligence, computational intelligence, knowledge bases, data mining, and machine learning. Many of typical software development issues can benefit from these disciplines. For this reason, this paper will employ computational intelligence approach to classify software component repository into similar component cluster groups with the help of Fuzzy Subtractive Clustering algorithm. The center of each cluster will be used to construct the coarse grain classification indexing structure. Subsequent retrieval requirements of software component are compared with all the indexed cluster centers. Any software components belonging to the cluster partition whose center is closest to the required software component will be retrieved for subsequent participation in component selection at fine grain level. This approach not only is suitable for multidimensional data, but also automatically decides the correct model classification.